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Connecting those called to urban ministry, this network examines the special needs of city dwellers
and seeks out models of hope addressing such needs.

 
HOPE•II Budapest May 9–13
 

The “Cities” network which was formally established in 2002 at the HOPE•21 Congress in Budapest was planned by Robert Calvert (Rotterdam) and Steve Thrall (Paris). Urban ministry consultations and trails are organized each year across Europe. A new initiative at the Hope II Congress in Budapest 2011 is joined by Axel Nehlsen (Berlin), Andrei Madly (Cluj) and David Clark (Dundee).
 
Come to the Congress (excellent speakers in plenary sessions, Monday evening and Tuesday May 9&10), and the Cities network (in the Hotel Budapest, Szilagyi Erzsebet Fasor 47, 1026 Budapest, on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday morning, May 11-13).

 

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We would like to hear your city stories from the different regions of Europe and to especially hear new perspectives from young people in your city. We reflect biblically and Isaiah 65: 17-25 remains a source of hope for the transformation of our cities.

Think about and be prepared in ten to fifteen minutes to:
• tell about your ministry in the context of your city
• share a story of pain and suffering in your ministry
• reflect on how you approached it and what you learned from it

• Discover new information and up-to-date profiles of cities
• Expect to engage with biblical, historical and contemporary models of urban ministry
• Choose to visit one from a list of urban ministries in Budapest sent to you in advance


Goals of the network


I    Inspire and motivate urban ministry practitioners by story telling and reflection

II    Rethink approaches to urban ministry to engage missionally with our cities

III    Meet with urban ministry practitioners and make available relevant resources


Five distinct areas of interest

1. Leadership development
• diagnostic approach to knowing your city
• urban pastoral challenges and competencies
• opportunities for doctoral studies (BGU and others)

2. Church renewal
• enabling old churches to become new
• building up ethnic diversity and leadership
• using the past to transform the present

3. Church multiplication
• researching people groups
• planting new churches in big cities
• recognising migrant churches (reverse mission)
 
4. Community/city transformation
• building city-wide coalitions and platforms
• prayer for cities, urban systems and neighbourhoods
• approaches to community development

5. People in pain
• ‘at risk’ groups – e.g. homeless, Roma, uprooted
• approaches to advocacy and diaconal service
• marginalised peoples – e.g. artists, inner-city youth

Cities Network Schedule:
Wednesday (11 May)     – four sessions in hotel from 08.30 to 17.00

Thursday (12 May)         – two sessions in hotel from 08.30 to 12.00
                                       – ministry visits* in Budapest from 12.00 to 17.00**

Friday (13 May)              – two sessions in hotel from 08.30 to 12.00***

*  
   Probably in Gazdagrét, Békás megyér, Talipont, Budaörs – Baptista, Fogarasi Gábor   
**    Lunch and dinner is served in the hotel with exception of packed lunch on Thursday
***     We expect to reflect with one of the plenary speakers on Friday morning though it is
understood that you may leave before 12.00 to catch a flight


Facilitators:
Robert Calvert (Rotterdam), Steve Thrall (Paris), Axel Nehlsen (Berlin), Andrei Madly (Cluj)


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Cities’ consultation:

Think about and be prepared in ten to fifteen minutes to:
• tell about your ministry in the context of your city
• share a story of pain and suffering in your ministry
• reflect on how you approached it and what you learned from it

Discover new information and up-to-date profiles of cities
Expect to engage with biblical, historical and contemporary models of urban ministry

Choose to visit one from a list of urban ministries in Budapest sent to you in advance


Schedule:

Wednesday (11 May)     – four sessions in hotel from 08.30 to 17.00

Thursday (12 May)         – two sessions in hotel from 08.30 to 12.00

– ministry visits* in Budapest from 12.00 to 17.00**

Friday (13 May)         – two sessions in hotel from 08.30 to 12.00***

*     Probably in Gazdagrét, Békás megyér, Talipont, Budaörs – Baptista, Fogarasi Gábor
    
**    Lunch and dinner is served in the hotel with exception of packed lunch on Thursday

***     We expect to reflect with one of the plenary speakers on Friday morning though it is
understood that you may leave before 12.00 to catch a flight


Facilitators:

Robert Calvert (Rotterdam), Steve Thrall (Paris), Axel Nehlsen (Berlin), Andrei Madly (Cluj)



Bios of resource folk:

Jennifer Roemhildt Tunehag has worked for over a decade among women and men in prostitution and victims of human trafficking. In Athens, Greece, Jennifer started the ministry Lost Coin (now Nea Zoi, or New Life). Her experiences there led to an invitation in 2006 to testify before the US Congress about human trafficking. After turning the ministry over to new leadership, Jennifer began focusing on the challenge of engaging the global church in Christ's mission of individual restoration and societal transformation. She is now working to assist the EEA in developing the European Freedom Network (EFN). EFN works to connect national Alliances with active and emerging ministries and other stakeholders in their context, and serves those networks by providing the tools they need for effective cooperation and action. Jennifer says, "I believe that we have the opportunity and the obligation to respond redemptively to this crisis. The global church, operating locally, can be a powerful force in the battle against human trafficking!" Jennifer lives with her husband, Mats, in Stockholm, Sweden. She serves on the Human Trafficking Task Force of the WEA, and also works with other international organizations as a missions consultant on issues of prostitution and trafficking.
 
Ionut Grecu says I have always been opened towards new things but in the same time, I haven’t rejected the conventional – as a getaway to the youth’s “normality”. Commonplace, prosaic and stereotype irritate me. Originality suits me, and the environment in which I’ve studied allowed me to develop this skill. I love the competitive spirit and I like to struggle to accomplish my objectives. I know how to accept defeat as an achievement. For me everything is a big adventure which I like to take part in on one condition: to bear the spirit mark. I’ve always strived to live according to a decalogue, as long as it stimulate my sense of freedom.
For the last three months I’ve been on a placement at Scots International Church, under the guidance of Robert Calvert, gathering knowledge about urban ministry, which, as a future Orthodox priest, will prove to be valuable, with a real practical application in the modern context of Romanian’s Christianity.
 
Andrei Popirda, is 22 years old, a student in the third year at the Faculty of Orthodox Theology Dumitru Staniloae, Iasi, Romania. I am a good conflict mediator and also an ability to coordinate a team thanks to my good overview upon things and to objectively evaluate a situation.  For the last three months I’ve been on a placement at Scots International Church of Rotterdam, where I’ve developed intercultural communication skills, also I’ve learned new things about modern urban ministry. In these past few months I’ve learned that in Europe without borders, religion is an important factor. Religious pluralism can be approached terms of social, political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, but for those who have a pastoral responsibility of the communities, the first approach towards them should be in terms of pastoral and theological care. In the same time, we must learn how to cope with new problems the society, such as freedom without responsibility, poverty, value crisis, unemployment, family crisis etc. This way we need to deepen the dialogue, one’s own spirituality into freedom and the permanent education for developing a culture of cohabitation.
 
Steve Thrall came to Paris as an urban missionary in 1988. They were part of a multicultural Church planting team in Paris and Steve served as pastor of the inner city church they planted. Steve’s missiological interests led him further into investigations concerning French culture and art. Steve completed his Doctor of ministry in 2005 where he focused on the connections between Art, Mission and French culture. He then served as interim pastor of the French Baptist church 2007-2008 while continuing his involvement with artists before taking on in 2008 as a full time pastor and coordinator of a ministry for artists in downtown Paris. Steve also directs a multi-purpose arts centre in the heart of Paris. Steve and Miki Thrall have three children: Rebecca (1986), Sarah (1989) and Jonathan (1995).
 
Axel Nehlsen was a pastor in a local church parish in West Berlin from 1977 to 1988 whern he became director of missions at Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedaechtniskirche in central Berlin where he was in charge of spiritual counseling and mission outreach. Since 2002 he has been director of the interdenominational network Gemeinsam fuer Berlin (Together for Berlin). His passion is the unity of the body of Christ and the cultural impact of the church towards transformation of the city. Axel is a board member of the National Committee of the Evangelical Alliance and leading its national prayer group. Axel is married for 36 years to Renate and have three grown up children.
 
Andrei Madly has been involved in student ministry since 1991 with Campus Crusade, IFES and YWAM. He has a weekly radio broadcast ‘The World Between My Ears’ on a local Christian station. His main topic of interest is Christianity as a worldview and the impact of worldview on individual, family and church life. Andrei is a lay counsellor and preacher while also being self employed in a family business producing ‘Marsupi’ baby carriers. Andrei is married to Johanna and they have three teenage children.
 
Robert Calvert was a pastor in Glasgow housing estate before coming to Rotterdam in 1995 to develop a city-centre ministry to people of more than forty nationalities at the Scots International Church. He gained a Doctor of Ministry from Eastern Seminary in Philadelphia with Ray Bakke and is now working Ph.D. research on migrant churches with the University of Utrecht. At Hope for Europe I in Budapest in 2002 Robert helped to set up a European network for urban ministry practitioners as part of the Hope for Europe movement. Each year Robert organizes consultations and trails, supervises student placements and teaches on urban ministry in universities and seminaries. He is married to Lesley-Ann who works for the Rotterdam School of Management and they have a daughter, three sons and a grandson.